By Platinum Team August 6, 2018

The Bookshelf: Our List of Good Reads

This post is part of a quarterly series stemming from our team’s love of growth and learning. Here we share some worthwhile reads for any clients, partners and friends who are passionate about personal development too! It’s that time — the school year is revving back up. Does anyone else get slightly nostalgic during this season? That longing for a fresh stack of books and school supplies can be quite real. Well, for all you fellow bookworms out there, we’ve rounded up a few more favorites. (And, if you didn’t catch ‘em before, check out previous picks here and here.) Hopefully getting your hands on a copy of one of these can help satisfy the nostalgic cravings in some way, shape or form. As far as the rest of the school supplies though, you’re on your own 😉  

 

What Happy People Know by Dan Baker

The nutshell: You know that saying, “Don’t judge a book by it’s cover?” That definitely applies here. Though the cover screams cheesy self-help, looks are deceiving. This is a book rooted in solid psychology that challenges you to reassess your understanding of what it means to be happy.

Why we love it: It’s accessible. It’s not heavy science nor is it total fluff. And, most importantly, the concepts discussed have real power to change your life.

Who it’s for: This is the perfect read for anyone who is struggling to understand what will bring them happiness in life.  

 

Tribal Leadership by Dave Logan, Halee Fischer-Wright and John King

The nutshell: How can you up the ante in an organization’s culture? This book’s assertion is — leverage the power of tribes. Tribal Leadership outlines an understanding of natural human groups that can help you improve your organization’s effectiveness, engagement and overall success.

Why we love it: Shifting an organization’s culture ain’t easy. This book recognizes that fact and gives you tangible tactics to create real change.

Who it’s for: Are you a leader? Are you working to create change within an organization or among a group of people? This one may be for you!  

 

Originals by Adam Grant

The nutshell: How can you speak up without getting fired? How can you speak the truth, instead of going along with the majority? This book reveals the secret, asserting that non-conformist doesn’t have to be a bad word.

Why we love it: It’s about not playing the yes-man or yes-woman. It’s about learning to be brutally honest in a non-brutal way.

Who it’s for:With applications in both personal and professional life, this book is appropriate for anyone who wants to learn to step into that powerful role of speaking the truth.  

 

Everybody Matters by Bob Chapman and Raj Sisodia

The nutshell: This book offers an approach to leadership that’s led by the belief that everyone matters. Chapman and Sisodia assert that truly taking this belief to heart dramatically improves business performance.

Why we love it: It’s a book filled to the brim with inspiration. The central story is of a company that made it through the Great Depression when the entire team banded together as a “family.” The bond they made through the tragedies and the triumphs was unbreakable, and the way each was treated truly did demonstrate living a life where Everybody Matters.

Who it’s for:This is especially suited for those who choose to be leaders — whether by title or choice. It’s easy to say “everybody matters,” but do we really live that each and every day? Most of us can learn from this book how to truly take this belief to heart.  

 

Thrive by Arianna Huffington

The nutshell: This book presents a refreshing take on how to measure success in life. Arianna presents four key pillars that compose the book — well being, wisdom, wonder and giving — offering these in contrast to the common metrics of money and power.

Why we love it: She weaves her personal story together with journalistic evidence to shape this worthwhile perspective on what contributes to a successful life.

Who it’s for:It can be tough to step beyond those measures of money and power so dominant in our culture. This book offers encouragement to do just that and a reminder that you’re not alone in that journey!